ATKINS SAW

FMATAS

New member
CAN ANYONE TELL ME ANYTHING ABOUT THIS SAW?  PICKED IT UP AT A GARAGE SALE FOR 10$
 

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Peter Storey Pentz

Well-known member
FMATAS,

What exactly are you asking?  It is an Atkins miter (British: mitre) saw.  Only hardcore 19th and early 20th Century re-enactors use them.  The rest of us use electrically powered chop saws.  This is the technology between the backsaw and the simple wooden miter box and that which is generally used now.  PSP
 

msiemsen

Well-known member
That looks like an early Stanley miter box(or a company Stanley later acquired).
With an Atkins saw (made in Indianapolis). Notice that the box is laid out in segments and not degrees.
 

Mark Maleski

Administrator
Peter Storey Pentz said:
"Only hardcore 19th and early 20th Century re-enactors use them.  The rest of us use electrically powered chop saws."  

Well I don't know about that...I'm no re-enactor but I prefer my Stanley miter box to my chop saw since I can get better precision with less dust in the air.  Another bonus is that I can hold the stock right next to the blade without making the hair on the back of my neck stand on end.  I've only had my miter box for a few months, so could end up changing my mind...but for now my chop saw is now in the basement, relegated to carpentry tasks.

Miter box does take up more space than a chop saw, though.  
 

Peter Storey Pentz

Well-known member
Mark,

I did not mean to belittle anyone's working methods.  When my fingers are at risk I use a modified bench hook, a backsaw (Japanese), and a block plane for fine tuning.

Mostly, I was taken with the idea that 200 years hence, there might be 20th Century re-enactors.  PSP
 
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