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Many pieces of Cadwalader furniture are yet to be discovered. These may well throw more light on the
relationship between the various pieces and the workshops and carvers involved.  The hairy paw foot is
a very rare form for the period but can be seen used by a number of carvers employed by Thomas Affleck
(1740 -1795) and Benjamin Randolph (1721 - 1791) on the furniture produced for Cadwalader between
1769 -71.
 
The hairy paw foot is a very rare form for the period but can be seen used by a number of carvers employed
by Thomas Affleck (1740 -1795) and Benjamin Randolph (1721 - 1791) on the furniture produced for
Cadwalader between 1769 -71.
 
.A common feature on much Cadwalader furniture is the distinctive hairy paw foot clutching a flattened ball seen on chairs, tables and fire screens.
 
Philadelphia furniture looked toward London as the height of fashion. However, by 1770 the hairy paw foot was not a fashionable form (its use predominantly found in Ireland).
 
It may well be that John and Elizabeth Cadwalader adopted the use of a hairy lion paw from the particularly hirsute lion seen on the Lloyd family crest.
 
Interestingly the use of a wolf, also a hairy quadruped, on the Cadwalader family crest means the use of a carved hairy paw could be considered appropriate for both families.
 
 
 
 
 
Hairy paw foot of bed.
CB50
CB51
What we now term a "hairy paw" foot was referred to in the eighteenth century merely as a claw foot. The price of carving such a foot was explained in The 1772 Philadelphia Furniture Price Book-- claws for tables, chairs, tea tables, and chests were billed at only 1s 6d each, these being  carved not by the master but by a journeyman. As a bedstead had larger legs and feet the charge rose to 2s.19.  
 
The division of labour within the same piece of furniture is a noted Philadelphia practice where different carvers can be seen to have worked on the left and right side of the same chair.
 
Work that is not as close to the eye (such as the bed canopy)  would be executed by a journeyman not as skilled as his master.As the complete furnishing of the Cadwalader mansion was such a huge commission this division of labour made economic sense.