Author Topic: Firescreen hardware  (Read 4357 times)

Jeff Saylor

  • Forum Master
  • ***
  • Posts: 111
  • Retired H.S. Industiral Arts teacher
    • Jeff Saylor
Firescreen hardware
« on: March 12, 2009, 04:55:20 PM »
I'm beginning a firescreen and would like to know how the screens are adjusted.  Anyone know what the hardware is like and where to get it?
Jeff Saylor
SAPFM #211  Hobbies include hunting, fishing, making furniture, searching for old tools at flea markets.

Antiquity Period Designs, Ltd.

  • Forum Master
  • ***
  • Posts: 408
  • Professional period furniture maker, - now retired
Re: Firescreen hardware
« Reply #1 on: March 12, 2009, 05:45:35 PM »
I buy my firescreen hardware from Ball & Ball.

Dennis Bork
Antiquity Period Designs, Ltd.
Professional period furniture maker since 1985.  Received a B.S. degree in physics then apprenticed and worked as a wood patternmaker for 12 years. Cartouche recipient 2009. Retired Dec. 2018.

Peter H. Wallace

  • Forum Apprentice
  • *
  • Posts: 7
  • Windsor Chair Maker
    • Peter H. Wallace, Windsor Chair Maker
Re: Firescreen hardware
« Reply #2 on: March 21, 2009, 09:36:19 AM »
In addition to buying firescreen hardware from Ball and Ball, Londonderry Brasses also sells such hardware.   Londonderry Brasses is located in Oxford, PA, and can be found on the internet with a Google search.   They may be slightly more expensive but they advertise themselves as histoically accurate makers of brass hardware.

  Peter H. Wallace
  www.windsor-chairs.com

Jeff Saylor

  • Forum Master
  • ***
  • Posts: 111
  • Retired H.S. Industiral Arts teacher
    • Jeff Saylor
Re: Firescreen hardware
« Reply #3 on: March 24, 2009, 07:59:57 PM »
Just received a catalog from Ball & Ball but I didn't find firescreen or polescreen hardware.  Haven't found it on their website either.  Anyone know what it's listed under?
Jeff Saylor
SAPFM #211  Hobbies include hunting, fishing, making furniture, searching for old tools at flea markets.

msiemsen

  • Regional Chapter Coordinator
  • Forum Master
  • ***
  • Posts: 586
  • Full time woodworker, I sell tall clock movements
    • Green Lake Clock Company
Re: Firescreen hardware
« Reply #4 on: March 24, 2009, 08:23:02 PM »
This link will take you to Londonderry's pole screen hardware page.
http://www.londonderry-brasses.com/Pg303.html
Mike
Mike Siemsen
Green Lake Clock Company
There are II kinds of people in the world. Those that can read roman numerals and those that can't

NLandry

  • Guest
Re: Firescreen hardware
« Reply #5 on: March 24, 2009, 09:25:46 PM »
Jeff,

The fire screen hardware from Ball & Ball is listed under House Assessories, then under Miscellaneous Fittings.  Stock No. U39-068 is the one I use.  There are some others listed on the same page.

Norman
« Last Edit: March 24, 2009, 09:30:21 PM by Norman Landry »

Jeff Saylor

  • Forum Master
  • ***
  • Posts: 111
  • Retired H.S. Industiral Arts teacher
    • Jeff Saylor
Re: Firescreen hardware
« Reply #6 on: March 25, 2009, 12:09:31 PM »
Thanks to all for the replies.  Next question- I was going to stretch a tapestry over a pine frame and then install it from the back of the "show" framework in a rabbet.  Do firescreens usually have a solid back attached also, or is the hardware attached directly to the frame?
Jeff Saylor
SAPFM #211  Hobbies include hunting, fishing, making furniture, searching for old tools at flea markets.

NLandry

  • Guest
Re: Firescreen hardware
« Reply #7 on: March 25, 2009, 12:24:38 PM »
Jeff,

I have seen period screens of all manner.  Some have a solid back, most have a fabric back tacked to the back of the "show" frame and some have nothing at all.  The hardware is usually attached to the frame.  That's been my experience.

Norman

Peter H. Wallace

  • Forum Apprentice
  • *
  • Posts: 7
  • Windsor Chair Maker
    • Peter H. Wallace, Windsor Chair Maker
Re: Firescreen hardware
« Reply #8 on: March 26, 2009, 06:19:33 PM »
Jeff,  . . .the  fire screens adjustments can be done in at least two different ways.  The first is with a box thread cutter which enables you to raise and lower the actual screen by "winding" the screen up or downon cut threads   The second way is with brass hardware which allows the screen to slide up and down and is set in position with a thumb screw threaded into the back of the upper brass slide.   The bottom brass slide merely hold the screen plumb.   Simple straight forward means of attaching a screen to post in both examples. 

 Peter H. Wallace