Author Topic: Period Furniture Photo Library  (Read 11929 times)

ASwartz

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Re: Period Furniture Photo Library
« Reply #15 on: September 25, 2008, 10:33:50 AM »
If people are serious about this, I'd be happy to help address the legal issues.  That's my day job.

Adam Cherubini

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Re: Period Furniture Photo Library
« Reply #16 on: September 25, 2008, 12:41:44 PM »
This is a subject that came up at our first Junto.  So there's the legal issue.  That needs to get worked.   And then there's the issue Dennis and John are raising.  If we do it, will it be valuable to people? 

Here's my take: I think every woodworker wants free project plans.  Many many woodworkers start woodworking because they love to build stuff, any stuff.  For these guys complete and accurate plans are a necessity.  Period furniture makers are often a bit different, however.  Many I have met are motivated by the design and style of the items they make, I think more than the general population.   While I'm sure all of these guys would love to have very complete plans, I think they would also benefit from just seeing pictures of furniture.  And I agree that the perspective of the photographer makes a big difference.  I take front, and side views.  Whenever possible I shoot details, construction etc.  Curator types shoot ISO views that I personally find less helpful.

I think the bigger question is should we consider a period woodworking database/online reference source?  And if so, what should go in it?  And can we get the information?  Do we need it all?  And who should host it?  EAIA may be interested.  There was an EAIA rep at our first Junto.

I'll read what you guys have to say on the subject.    Email me offline if you have any specific questions.  I know the reproductions people in both Philly and Winterthur.  They would be the first people I would talk to regarding reproduction rights.

Adam

dkeller_nc

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Re: Period Furniture Photo Library
« Reply #17 on: October 01, 2008, 11:55:45 AM »
Not to supercede Aswartz on this - no doubt he could give a considerably more nuanced (and complete) opinion on the copyright thing, but I've a good bit of experience on the practical aspects of copyright as it applies to photography, as I've been doing it (photography) for about 30 years or so.

In general, and with the exceptions noted, if you take the photograph, you own the copyright by default.  The exception is that if you enter into a legal agreement with the owner of the object (or person, as the case may be) to sign over the copyright for specific considerations, such as the limited right to use the owner's name in a description of the object in a publication.  Another exception is the use of a photograph of a recognizable individual for commercial purposes - i.e., you can't take a close-up picture of Jeff Gordon at a NASCAR event and use it for financial gain without his permission.

However, that restriction does not apply to the owners of physical objects.  For example, you can take an image of the exterior of an historic building from a public area (like the street) and publish with an identification in a magazine, regardless of the owner's feelings on the issue.

Obviously, however, the best route on something like this is the permission of the owner of the object in writing.  My own personal experience on this with antique owners in the local area is that some are thrilled and proud that someone is interested in photographing and reproducing their heirloom, and some want nothing to do with it.  I'd bet we'd find a similar situation with Museums - those that are famous may be a lot less interested (particularly if they're granting access to reproducers in exchange for a fee or licensing agreement), and some that are out-of-the-way may love the idea of getting some publicity for their organization.
Period Furniture & Carving as a hobby - about 20 years woodworking

ASwartz

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Re: Period Furniture Photo Library
« Reply #18 on: October 01, 2008, 03:25:23 PM »
I've found that it is difficult (and risky) to talk about legal matters in the abstract.  That said, dkeller is generally correct.  Museums may have enforceable copyrights in their own photgraphs of their furniture, but they do not own copyrights on the piece of furniture itself -- to the extent there is a copyright on a piece of furniture, the copyright has long since expired on the furniture we're interested in.  Therefore, one could take pictures of a piece of period furniture and make reproductions 'till the cows come home and not be in violaiton of copyright law. That said, "can" does not necessarily mean "should."  When dealing with museums, I would not want to jeopardize SAPFM's carefully cultivated relationships (and access) by distributing photos, plans, etc. in a way that would anger the museum.  Perhaps the way to start this would be to approach likely museums as a group, explain our interest in examining furniture in more detail, and sharing images and dimensions within the group.  Who knows, some farsighted museum curators might appreciate the interest and be willing to facilitate our endeavor. 

jim vojcek

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Re: Period Furniture Photo Library
« Reply #19 on: October 02, 2008, 03:18:29 PM »
Adam,

This post sounds very interesting; however, what is a JUNTO and have you had more than one?  Can you tell me what an EAIA is, as well?

Thanks,
 
Jim Vojcek














msiemsen

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Re: Period Furniture Photo Library
« Reply #20 on: October 02, 2008, 10:42:51 PM »
Jim,
From wikipedia
    This is about the Philadelphia club, c. 1730. For other uses, see Junto (disambiguation).

The Junto was a club established in 1727 by Benjamin Franklin for mutual improvement in Philadelphia. Also known as the Leather Apron Club, its purpose was to debate questions of morals, politics, and natural philosophy, and to exchange knowledge of business affairs.

EAIA Early American Industries Association
http://www.eaiainfo.org/
Mike
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jim vojcek

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Re: Period Furniture Photo Library
« Reply #21 on: October 05, 2008, 02:17:47 PM »
Mike,

Thanks for the input.  The Early American Industries Association sounds like a nice group.  In the Chicago area there is the Midwest Tool Collectors Assoc.
 
Again thanks,

Jim