Author Topic: Boston Bookcase mutins  (Read 8119 times)

ttalma

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Boston Bookcase mutins
« on: October 17, 2007, 02:53:05 PM »
Attached is a couple of pictures of a drawing I am working on for the boston bookcase from a previous topic (http://sapfm.org/forum/index.php?topic=165.0)

I was wondering if this is correct. The first picture is where the mutins meet to divde the panes.

The second is where the mutins meet the rails and stiles.

If these are not correct could someone explain the correct method of joining them.

Thank -Tim
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HSteier

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Re: Boston Bookcase mutins
« Reply #1 on: October 18, 2007, 09:00:55 AM »
Gene Landon drew up plans for a similar piece for a course at Olde Mill. The joinery was coped, not mitered. Coping is easier than mitereing and is more forgiving. There are pictures of this in an article Gene did years ago. It's reprinted in one of Taunton's books, but I don't remember which one and I'm in my office now so I can't check for you. If no-one else comes up with the reference, I'll check when I go home.

Howard Steier

Tom M

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Re: Boston Bookcase mutins
« Reply #2 on: October 18, 2007, 10:21:27 AM »
Tim, call me.  I have a sample joint I can show you. You can also see the plans Howard mentioned,which by the way I drew for Gene :)
Tom Meiller, SAPFM Member #684

K A R

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Re: Boston Bookcase mutins
« Reply #3 on: October 18, 2007, 07:17:45 PM »
Tom,

I am also interested is seeing how the muntins were treated by Gene Landon in the piece referenced by Howard Steier.  Any chance that some of the information could be posted here on the Forum. In the alternative if there is an available printed reference for the coped muntins and bookcase as done by Gene Landon, the name of that reference would be greatly appreciated.  Thanks,

Kent Ryan

ttalma

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Re: Boston Bookcase mutins
« Reply #4 on: October 19, 2007, 10:02:17 AM »
Iwas able to tlk to Tom who was a great help. I was also able to track down the article Howard mentioned, I am not sure which book the artilce is in but it is in the May/June issue of 1987 # 64 page 37. This article is from Gene and has some good pictures on his technique.
There are 10 types of people in this world, those that understand binary and those that don't.

Tom M

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Re: Boston Bookcase mutins
« Reply #5 on: October 19, 2007, 10:25:53 AM »
Attached is a cut-out from my Pewter Press drawing showing the details.  The full drawing is available from Olde Mill.  The Pewter press is based on the Logan Press at Stenton.

The Logan press is a couple inches deeper (Gene did his based on a photo), and the mullions are narrower.  This results in Gene's being a little taller.  I saw the Logan press with the Curator, and the doors were still in great shape - opened and closed nicely, and looks to be original glass - wonderfully bubbled and wavey.  The back boards are horizontal and painted.  Gene used vertical boards of primary wood.  A great photo is in "Wordly Goods".

I'm also including an article I wrote for my woodworker's club, which has some pictures.
Tom Meiller, SAPFM Member #684

K A R

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Re: Boston Bookcase mutins
« Reply #6 on: October 19, 2007, 11:50:39 AM »
Thanks to you both -

Tim, the FWW reference will work great - times like this help me justify - to my wife - why I keep that stack of old magazines around.

Tom,  thanks for the files.  They are quite helpful in my understanding of "coped" vs. "mitered" as it relates to the treatment of the mullions for this press.

Kent

ttalma

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Re: Boston Bookcase mutins
« Reply #7 on: October 19, 2007, 01:15:53 PM »
I have changed the drawing to reflect Gene's method. Thanks alot to Tom for answering my questions. And the article was also very helpful.

I will attach a drawing of the change in a few days.
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ttalma

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Re: Boston Bookcase mutins
« Reply #8 on: October 22, 2007, 09:26:09 AM »
I am trying to attach the pics but keep getting an upload folder is full error. Anyone know what is wrong?
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Mark Arnold

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Re: Boston Bookcase mutins
« Reply #9 on: October 22, 2007, 12:40:26 PM »
Tim,

Try uploading again. It should work now.

Mark
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ttalma

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Re: Boston Bookcase mutins
« Reply #10 on: October 23, 2007, 11:16:28 AM »
Herte are the pics. As always if there errors in the construction please let me know and I will fix them.
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chamfer

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Re: Boston Bookcase mutins
« Reply #11 on: October 23, 2007, 10:37:15 PM »
Hi Tim,

Sorry to be asking this so late, but I was wondering about the scale of these doors and their various elements? The reason I'm asking is that the scale may have some bearing on the method of construction.

Larger/heavier glazed (joiner built-ins?) cabinet doors seem to have been made using "sash" type construction per the suggestions you've received, while more delicate barred doors in higher style pieces were often built using a very different method of construction. Thought it might be worth discussing this alternative, but only if it seems potentially appropriate.

Don McConnell
Eureka Springs, AR

ttalma

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Re: Boston Bookcase mutins
« Reply #12 on: October 24, 2007, 01:52:43 PM »
Don,
No problem. These are 3/4" wide I am pretty sure of the style of construction. I zoomed in on the pictures as best I could. And if you look at the picture of the piece from a previous thread these are not to delicate. I believe these were even larger on the original piece, I have scalled the piece down from 102" to 90" so it will fit on the second floor of my house. and have tried to scale everything down accordingly.

As for size the lower cabinet doors are 27" tall and 21" wide.

I am alsmost done with the drawing and plan to post some pics here. Once the plans are finalized I will provide them to SAPFM members.
There are 10 types of people in this world, those that understand binary and those that don't.

ttalma

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Re: Boston Bookcase mutins
« Reply #13 on: October 25, 2007, 03:35:27 PM »
I have finished the model and will work on the construction plans soon. I hope to have them finished next week. Here is a picture of the bookcase.
There are 10 types of people in this world, those that understand binary and those that don't.