Author Topic: Worm holes in Butternut  (Read 4598 times)

Tom M

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Re: Worm holes in Butternut
« Reply #30 on: March 23, 2020, 04:13:11 PM »
It's been two weeks since my last post.  No replys!


I have so many more stories and pictures to share, but I set the rule at the beginning: New post only after a reply!


Think what you are all missing - drawer construction, back assembly, making and installing the moldings!
Tom Meiller, SAPFM Member #684

ttalma

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Re: Worm holes in Butternut
« Reply #31 on: April 01, 2020, 09:25:31 AM »
Sorry I have't been on the forum much! I'll do better, I promise!


I'd come over and look but....


I like the drawer fronts using the knots that would look neat around the pulls. I've seen grain painted furniture doing this, but never the actual wood.


I don't really think like that, I'm not very artistic, and I like straight grain, so that is what I always look for. I would have thrown the knots in the burn box.


Making the back is always satisfying to me. I feel like that's the point where it all comes together! I use my 45 for doing the tongue and groove. I might have to get one of those plane, mostly because I don't have one!
There are 10 types of people in this world, those that understand binary and those that don't.

Tom M

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Re: Worm holes in Butternut
« Reply #32 on: April 03, 2020, 02:01:34 PM »
With the back boards fitted, but not installed, I moved on to the drawers.
 
After sizing the drawer fronts, I realized the hollowed knot region on the backside of one of the boards ended up being located right where the pins would be cut. I replaced it with my 3rd choice and oriented them such that it almost looks like continuous grain.
 
I roughed formed the ovolo molding on the drawer front using a block plane, rabbet plane, and scraper. Next, I cut the rabbet at the top and side of the drawer front on the table saw and cleaned-up with my rabbet plane.  This is a “German” style drawer with the bottom trenailed, so I held off on the bottom rabbet until I had planed the bottom board.
 
I cut the tails on the sides first and then the half-blind pins.  A couple years ago I came across a simple jig that helps greatly for laying out dovetails.  I think it was from a Fine Woodworking e-mail I received. Just a scrap piece of plywood and a small scrap of wood! This simple jig makes layout so much easier by making alignment a breeze.
 
I laid out the pins on both backs.  After cutting the first set I found out I had laid the pins out on the wrong side of the board. I found a nice replacement piece in my cut-off pile. But by the time I had planed the bow out of the board it was too thin.  For the third try I wanted to keep the same planer set-up for the final thickness, and so pulled out my old Ryobi AP-10 for the initial planing and finished with a final pass through my bigger planer. Oh, and then I realized I had changed the bigger planer to the thinner thickness.  So now I had one back with the pins flipped, and two backs which were too thin! But the fourth one came out nice!  I put all the drawer parts in the kitchen oven to heat them up before glue-up.  This worked great.
 
I then thickness planed the bottom board and cut the rabbet in the drawer fronts. I used white oak for the trenails because I was concerned 1/8” square butternut pegs might crush. Drawers complete!
 
Leaving the backs off made installation of the drawer guides much easier.  I was able to clamp the guides from the back which made drawer fitting simple.  I planed the side of the guides to get just the right clearance. The guides are held with some glue – mainly at the front.
 
Next up was installing the back boards.  I used 3/8” pegs and glue. I clamped the boards in position and pre-drilled the peg holes.  Glue-up was easy!
 
Coming up next time: moldings.  But first pictures:
 
 
1) CAD picture of drawer
 
2) Dovetail allignment jig
 
3) Dovetail layout
 
4) Drawer parts
 
5) Trenails
 
6 & 7) Drawers done
 
8) Back glued and pegged
 
9) Moldings next
Tom Meiller, SAPFM Member #684

Tom M

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Re: Worm holes in Butternut
« Reply #33 on: April 03, 2020, 02:04:20 PM »
I tried three times to post the pictures for the previous post and each time it crashed.  Thankfully I've been doing the writing in Word as this has happened before.  So let's try posting three at a time.


1) CAD picture of drawer
2) Dovetail allignment jig
3) Dovetail layout
« Last Edit: April 03, 2020, 02:06:11 PM by Tom M »
Tom Meiller, SAPFM Member #684

Tom M

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Re: Worm holes in Butternut
« Reply #34 on: April 03, 2020, 02:05:44 PM »
Let's see if the rest will post:


4) Drawer parts
5) Trenails
6 & 7) Drawers done
8) Back glued and pegged
9) Moldings next
Tom Meiller, SAPFM Member #684

daveknuth

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Re: Worm holes in Butternut
« Reply #35 on: April 04, 2020, 02:19:44 PM »
I like the dovetail jig. I might try it. Your tails look really clean. How were they done?

Tom M

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Re: Worm holes in Butternut
« Reply #36 on: April 04, 2020, 04:35:09 PM »

For the tails, I layout the spacing on the end grain with a knife and mark the base line with a knife. For small boards like these I position the board at the dovetail angle and cut on the vertical. I do half the cuts from one side, then flip the board for the other half. This way I can always register my fingernail in the knife line and cut on the waste side. I never mark the dovetail angle - just by eye. For the tails the "waste side" really doesn't matter, but I do it that way to be consistent for when I cut the pins. I then chisel out the waste. That's it, nothing special...

However, I will share this. Last summer I read a blog by Chris Schwarz about dovetail cutting and have since adopted this method with great results. It really made a difference in getting the cuts straight and perpendicular to the face of the board.  Start with a shallow cut on the end grain to guide the saw. Then start to tip the saw so it is mainly cutting on the facing side until it's at the baseline - in effect the cut will be from the baseline on the face to the top edge of the back. This forms a kerf which controls the saw when tipping in the other direction to cut the back side.  I like to make all of the shallow end grain cuts first. I will mark a pencil line on the face of the board when cutting the pins as a guide.


https://www.popularwoodworking.com/editors-blog/dovetailing-trick-beginners/
Tom Meiller, SAPFM Member #684

ttalma

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Re: Worm holes in Butternut
« Reply #37 on: April 13, 2020, 09:49:46 AM »
Looking great. I really like the knots in the drawer fronts. I like the dovetail alignment jig as well. I'll have to try that. I've use a method Jeff Headley taught, to stick a small piece of a drawer bottom in the drawer groove, and that works well also, but sometimes is hard to get to stay in place while setting everything up.


Why did you heat the drawer parts up? I've never heard of doing this, and I always use hot hide glue, and don't really see how it helps. When gluing up I do the following,


1. Get clamps, glue, drawer, and everything ready
2. Assemble drawer dry
3. Remove one side
4. Slather glue on the pegs and tails
5. press side in to place
6. repeat for other side
7. Slide bottom in
8. Clamp together, (And square if necessary, but drawer bottom normally does that).

There are 10 types of people in this world, those that understand binary and those that don't.

Tom M

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Re: Worm holes in Butternut
« Reply #38 on: April 14, 2020, 05:05:56 PM »
Tim,

The German style drawers have no bottom groove, so Jeff's method wouldn't work.  I've done drawers with the bottom groove and used the bottom as an alignment guide - works great as well. However, the FWW jig can work on pretty much any dovetail. Another thing I do is prep the boards the same width (even though the sides are not as wide as the front, and the back is not as wide as the sides.) I feel this makes layout easier.  I’ll rip to final width after dry assembling the drawer.

I put the drawer parts in the oven to warm them to keep the glue from gelling so fast.  Not really required for the drawers as they went together fast, but I did it anyway. A lot less clamp force is required to pull the joints tight.


Now on to the moldings.

The first molding I made was the cove molding for under the top of the bottom cabinet.  This required 1" square wood.  For layout, I 3D printed templates (my son gave me a 3D printer for Christmas, and I’ve found a lot of uses for it in the shop – templates, chisel guards, knobs, hinge samples, etc.)  They worked great, and I think I’ll be printing templates in the future! I made a couple rips on the table saw to remove the center of the cove, and then a round (#10 I think) to form the cove. I finished with a scraper I ground.  This was an easy molding, and a good one to start off with to build my confidence.

The next molding was for the base skirt. For this one I made two table saw cuts to start the fillets, and then I used a 45° bit at the router table to remove most of remaining wood.  A mix of a rabbet plane and hollow plane followed by a cabinet scraper finish the job.  I then spent some time cutting out the bracket feet detail. For the long internal rip cut on the front I used the table saw. The straight sections on the sides were too short to do on the table saw, so I rough cut them on the bandsaw and used a wide chisel to complete.

I cut the miters on my chop saw and used a wide pairing chisel (freshly sharpened) to adjust. My installation method is as follows: I cut the side pieces miters (keeping the boards long) and then one of the front miters. After positioning one side and the front I drilled a 1/8” hole in the middle of the front molding.  I use a drill bit or transfer punch in this hole to lock the position of the front piece so I can scribe the side of the cabinet on it. I make the scribe line using a block plane blade with a block of wood attached with carpet tape as a handle!

For the skirt molding I clamped a straight edge to the cabinet as a reference for the top surface of the molding.  I then glued the front and sides using clamps.  The moldings couldn’t shift during glue-up due to the pinned hole. After removing the clamps, I then drilled holes for the 3/8” pegs (one which eliminates the 1/8” hole. All the pegs later had to be carved to the molding profile – not hard to do in the soft Butternut.

Next, I’ll discuss the upper moldings.
« Last Edit: April 15, 2020, 11:50:38 AM by Tom M »
Tom Meiller, SAPFM Member #684

Tom M

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Re: Worm holes in Butternut
« Reply #39 on: April 14, 2020, 05:14:06 PM »
Pictures:

Tom Meiller, SAPFM Member #684

Tom M

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Re: Worm holes in Butternut
« Reply #40 on: April 14, 2020, 05:16:51 PM »
And some more....
Tom Meiller, SAPFM Member #684

macchips4

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Re: Worm holes in Butternut
« Reply #41 on: April 15, 2020, 09:21:48 AM »
Very nice Tom

ttalma

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Re: Worm holes in Butternut
« Reply #42 on: April 16, 2020, 09:46:53 AM »
Looking real good. I'd better not show this to Melissa!


For the templates, you could print a little lip on the ends so that it has a place to register against the wood.
There are 10 types of people in this world, those that understand binary and those that don't.

Tom M

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Re: Worm holes in Butternut
« Reply #43 on: April 17, 2020, 09:12:17 AM »
I like the concept of printing the templates with ledges to locate on the ends of the board.  To work I would need to have the edge on both sides of the template so I could flip it to mark both ends of the board. Good idea – Thanks!
 
UPPER MOLDINGS
 
I made all the molding for the upper and lower cabinets before starting assembly.  I had to get a picture of all of them together!
 
After completing the lower two moldings I made the bolection molding.  My painted pine cabinet had a similar molding which I scraped.  Unfortunately, this molding was a little larger, and so I considered making a new scraper.  It was then I realized I could make this with a side-bead and a round (but I ended up using a cove cutter at the router table).
 
The crown molding came next. This molding was the most complex.  I started by using the chamfer bit at the router table to form the center V. I then made multiple cuts on the table saw to remove most of the wood from the cove. I finished the cove using a #10 round and a scraper I ground to the shape. The round portion was then formed with a block plane, rabbet plane and scrapers. All that was left was to cut the two bevels.  This presented a predicament.  The angles were around 42° and 48°.  The 42° could be easily cut on the table saw.  The 48° would require running the board vertical against the fence and didn’t seem safe.  I ended up cutting the 48° at 45° and then hand planed to get the 48°.
 
The cap molding was easy. A quick run past the chamfer bit at the router table and a couple passes with a block plane and scraper.
 
I started by installing the cap molding.  I couldn’t find any evidence on Gene’s cabinet of pegs on the upper moldings, and I had a picture of the top of the cabinet which showed square cut nails, so I used Tremont cut nails to install all the moldings. To keep the cantilever ends aligned while gluing I used clamping blocks with adhesive sandpaper applied so they wouldn’t slip. A lot of clamps were involved but I could not be happier with the results.
 
I lost sleep over the compound miter cut on the crown molding (seriously I had dreams about it.)  I’ve installed lots of crown molding in our house and have made my share of cuts which were wrong.  I set up my chop saw for crown molding and used cut-offs from the ceiling crown to make practice cuts.  I laid these on the cabinet to be sure I had the layout correct. I made my side cuts and one front cut like I did on the base moldings. I marked the remaining cut using my block plane blade. I worked my way to a perfect fit by making several cuts. I repositioned the molding each time by changing a feeler gage next to my stop block.  Of course, there are a lot of errors built up in this cut due to the compound angle, and the fact the cabinet side might not be at a perfect right angle to the front.  To adjust the side piece miters I used carbon paper to look for contact points, and my big paring chisel to shave away material.
 
After these two moldings were done the bolection was a breeze.  I set all the nails and filled them with hide glue and fine butternut filings.
 
 
Next up: Doors.
« Last Edit: April 25, 2020, 08:02:05 AM by Tom M »
Tom Meiller, SAPFM Member #684

Tom M

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Re: Worm holes in Butternut
« Reply #44 on: April 17, 2020, 09:17:01 AM »
More pictures:
Tom Meiller, SAPFM Member #684