Author Topic: Unusual drawer joint on Victorian desk - doweled/scalloped shape  (Read 1886 times)

Bert Bleckwenn

  • Regional Chapter Coordinator
  • Forum Apprentice
  • ***
  • Posts: 33
In restoring my great-grandfather's Victorian oak drop-down desk, I discovered an unusual drawer joint that consists of formed dowel tenons and scalloped edges.  They were definitely machine made, but would like to know how they were created and if they have a special name.   

Picture attached of the drawer side which was about 4" high.  The doweled tenons are about 1/4" wide and the drawer side is about 7/16" thick and let into the drawer front into a matching scalloped joint.

The desk was likely made somewhere between 1895-1920 time period. While I could see how a cnc machine could reproduce the joint today, was wondering what type of woodworking machine was used.
Regards,
Bert A. Bleckwenn

rac50

  • Forum Journeyman
  • **
  • Posts: 78
Re: Unusual drawer joint on Victorian desk - doweled/scalloped shape
« Reply #1 on: January 05, 2016, 07:46:35 AM »
Bert,
The joint is referred to as a "pin and scallop" joint or a "knapp joint," after the machine that was developed to cut it. Many years back Fine woodworking magazine did an article on this. Here is another article that could give you a little more info. http://forums.finewoodworking.com/fine-woodworking-knots/joinery/what-joint-thi
Ross

Bert Bleckwenn

  • Regional Chapter Coordinator
  • Forum Apprentice
  • ***
  • Posts: 33
Re: Unusual drawer joint on Victorian desk - doweled/scalloped shape
« Reply #2 on: January 05, 2016, 09:30:16 AM »
Ross, Many thanks... just what I was looking for.  Helped me date the desk to somewhat earlier than I expected.
Regards,
Bert A. Bleckwenn

rac50

  • Forum Journeyman
  • **
  • Posts: 78
Re: Unusual drawer joint on Victorian desk - doweled/scalloped shape
« Reply #3 on: January 06, 2016, 10:20:18 AM »
Bert, You're welcome. Should you ever have to duplicate one, plug cutters and a scroll saw are any easy way to achieve this joint.