Author Topic: Getting a pulley balanced  (Read 4511 times)

Johnny D

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Getting a pulley balanced
« on: February 07, 2013, 08:22:21 PM »
I have a Delta shaper motor pulley which is causing vibration.  I'd like to have it balanced.  I live in the Northern Virginia area:  can anyone recommend a service to perform this form me?

Thanks

John

Mickey Callahan

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Re: Getting a pulley balanced
« Reply #1 on: February 08, 2013, 11:08:11 AM »
John,

Are you absolutely sure it's the pulley and not the belt? I've upgraded most all of my pulleys with machined ones and started using link belts that are available at Woodcraft. Check out McMaster-Carr or Grainger for machined pulleys.

Mickey
Maker of Fine Furniture

Johnny D

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Re: Getting a pulley balanced
« Reply #2 on: February 08, 2013, 04:15:26 PM »
Mickey:

It's definitely the pulley.  I took the motor out and ran it with and without the pulley.  Huge difference, the motor's smooth like glass.  

That's not to say that the belt isn't adding some vibration.  This belt is one of those flat jobs with about four or five small v-grooves.  Does anyone know of upgrades for this type of belt?

I'd like to know more about machined pulleys, do you have any sources or is it strictly a custom job for a machine shop?

Thanks

John
« Last Edit: February 08, 2013, 04:23:15 PM by Johnny D »

Tom M

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Re: Getting a pulley balanced
« Reply #3 on: February 09, 2013, 11:38:51 AM »
I recently replaced my 8" joiner pulley with a cast iron one from Grainger.  Cost under $20 if I recall.  For years I had problems with the die-cast pot metal pulley coming loose. Scared the heck out of me when I'd be working along and suddenly the pulley would slide down the motor shaft and ride against the enclosure sheet metal. I fixed it for a couple years by wrapping some 0.002" shim stock around the motor shaft. That finally stopped working a couple months ago. I finally realized this was stupid (I'd do just about anything to avoid spending $20!) Should have replaced it with cast iron the first time it came loose - lesson learned.

Tom
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millcrek

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Re: Getting a pulley balanced
« Reply #4 on: February 09, 2013, 11:57:22 AM »
I don't know where you live, but here in the country we have good comprehensive farm supply stores. They carry a wide selection of pulleys including machined steel and cast iron that are balanced in all sizes.

msiemsen

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Re: Getting a pulley balanced
« Reply #5 on: February 15, 2013, 12:50:51 PM »
You can balance the pulley yourself. You mount it to a proper diameter smooth shaft and set it on a couple of smooth steel rails that are level. the pulley will roll and stop with the heavy spot at the bottom, you then drill out a bit of metal at that spot to balance the pulley. Make sure that your pulley is not out of round. Then you need to replace it. McMaster Carr also sells pulleys
http://www.mcmaster.com/#multiple-groove-pulleys/=lhox2v
Mike Siemsen
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Johnny D

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Re: Getting a pulley balanced
« Reply #6 on: February 16, 2013, 07:51:09 AM »
Mike:
Thanks for the link.  That might be just what I need.  I had looked, but had not found.

Regards,

Johnny

Mark Bortner

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Re: Getting a pulley balanced
« Reply #7 on: February 19, 2013, 12:38:51 AM »
I'm concerned you may not even have the original pulleys, assuming you didn't buy this new? How old is it? The good, old Delta stuff was quite well made! You may want to try an automotive machine shop, many have the equipment to spin balance a crankshaft which would work for you.
Chose woodworking as my profession in 6th grade, been doing it ever since. Self employed furniture mfg. and set-up/maintenance man in a commercial woodshop. Pics of my old shop and furniture on myspace site and facebook.