Author Topic: Getting started with hide Glue  (Read 10407 times)

msiemsen

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Re: Getting started with hide Glue
« Reply #15 on: March 11, 2011, 08:08:45 AM »
I also had to repair my Hold Heet aluminum pot due to pin holes. I just drilled out the hole to the diameter of a small brass escutcheon pin, used the pin for a rivit, and riveted it shut. I believe if you check the pot that the pin holes line up with the rivets you can see in the bottom of the pot. I figured electrolytic reaction due to dissimilar metals. I used to fill the aluminum liner with glue but it is much easier to put water in it and use a jar for the glue. When you take the liner out when gluing the water holds the heat in your pot longer and you have warm water to dilute the glue. My pot is well over 20 years old and works fine. It is easier to put the jar in the fridge for storage as well. I believe the copper pots are superior to the aluminum ones but I have never actually used one with a copper liner so I have no actual experience to base it on. I have seen some great little copper pots on a warmer in use by some of the ORV chapter people. Maybe one of them can post a link as to where to get them.
You can slow the set up time  or make cold liquid glue by adding Urea from the garden center. If you heat up sand in a steel bucket and then put it in cloth flour sack or cotton pillow case (percale melts!) it makes a great flexible hot caul, good for curved surfaces. Put glue on the substrate and on the veneer, let it dry a bit, place the veneer and then the hot caul. Don't get the sand so hot it scorches the wood. There are so many different ways to do the same thing!
Mike
« Last Edit: March 11, 2011, 08:19:11 AM by msiemsen »
Mike Siemsen
Green Lake Clock Company
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Justin D

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Re: Getting started with hide Glue
« Reply #16 on: March 11, 2011, 08:31:55 AM »
Wow,
Tons of great information, and everything I was looking for.  I ordered some glue, will soon be on my way to having hide glue on every thing in my shop.  

JB and everyone else thanks for all the help with getting me started with hide glue.


Justin DiPalma

rdare

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Re: Getting started with hide Glue
« Reply #17 on: March 11, 2011, 02:47:40 PM »
Unly une thing to add. If you get hide glue on your clothes, it comes out in the wash. Just use hot water>
Dick Dare

John Cashman

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Re: Getting started with hide Glue
« Reply #18 on: March 11, 2011, 03:11:45 PM »
Coming out in the wash is a big plus. When Titebond 2 was introduced, my clothes got covered and it doesn't come out in the wash. Titebond 1 will. That might save some poor miscreant woodworker's life someday.

aurorawoodworks

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Re: Getting started with hide Glue
« Reply #19 on: March 11, 2011, 07:32:20 PM »
I put my glue in a glass jar and heat it in a water bath on a hot plate.  The nice thing about using a glass jar is that you can see inside the jar.  I had some glue that got old and began to grow mildew where the glue shrank away from the glass.  If I had used a metal pot, I never could have seen that. 

I leave my glue brush and thermometer in the glue when I'm done and let it go solid.

Keep your glue away from your dog.  My dog is very interested in hide glue.  I guess it smells like her wet rawhide bone. 

Tony

Chris J

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Re: Getting started with hide Glue
« Reply #20 on: March 11, 2011, 09:47:05 PM »
I use a mason jar in a water bath sitting in a Rival Hot Pot Express.

http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00006IUXU

Jefferson

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Re: Getting started with hide Glue
« Reply #21 on: March 12, 2011, 09:51:57 AM »
I think it's a good idea to store mixed glue in the fridge when not in use. Sure the next warm up time is a bit longer, but dealing with mold is something I can do without.

I recently gave my copper pot a good scrubbing, old darkened glue from the sides of the pot were sort of contaminating the fresh batch I had made and for some reason I really didn't like that. So after dumping as much as possible I stuck it in the sink in hot water and with some steel wool got the pot looking like new again. I'm sure it made no difference to the glue, but I feel better about it.

Oh yeah, the wife really loves the fact that I store the glue pot in the fridge too.