Author Topic: Dust Boards  (Read 15142 times)

jacon4

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Re: Dust Boards
« Reply #15 on: February 15, 2011, 05:05:11 PM »
MMMMMM, high chest from 1720s huh, I would love to see a pic. OK, weight & cost of installation seem to be the top candidates for why American makers choose to mostly not install full dust boards on their chest of drawers, this seems reasonable to me.

Jeff L Headley

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Re: Dust Boards
« Reply #16 on: February 15, 2011, 06:31:26 PM »
Nothing is as simple as it seems.

Jeff L Headley

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Re: Dust Boards
« Reply #17 on: February 15, 2011, 06:57:16 PM »
OK 1720's might be pushing it. You can't believe everything you read on the internet.
The feet were replaced a few months before I got it. What a nice job!!! If only I had been a little earlier before they were removed.$$$ I will get pictures of the bearers soon. The top molding is a secert drawer.

jacon4

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Re: Dust Boards
« Reply #18 on: February 16, 2011, 03:13:34 AM »
Neat @ the secret drawer, very william & mary feature, to bad about the feet but hey, they can be fixed. What kind of feet did it have, ball or bracket?

Nothing is as simple as it seems.

True, but as a collector i get to speculate like a mad man.

One of the things that i find great about American furniture is the makers were free to adapt, experiment not only in design but construction technique as well. It's my understanding that in England for instance, this was not the case, they had a powerful guild system with very rigid rules and regulations about building furniture.
« Last Edit: February 16, 2011, 04:09:04 AM by jacon4 »

jacon4

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Re: Dust Boards
« Reply #19 on: February 16, 2011, 05:41:16 AM »
OK, here is a recent sale of a Shenandoah Valley chest of drawers with 3/4 dust boards with impeccable provenance and a price tag to go with it, $48,875 with BP. An interesting feature are the wedges under the dust boards.
http://jeffreysevans.auctionflex.com/showlot.ap?co=45242&weid=13494&weiid=5262804&archive=y&lso=pricedesc&pagenum=1&lang=En

albreed

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Re: Dust Boards
« Reply #20 on: February 16, 2011, 07:13:21 AM »
Usually the top molding as a draw is a feature found on highboys, but your piece looks too tall to be a highboy top, I think. That would be a reason to "redo" the feet, however. Have a good look at the bottom to see if it's had feet before the present ones. Also look for a shadow around the base where the top may have sat in a molding to capture it.
As far as dating it goes, check for holes for cotter pin brasses, which would indicate an earlier date.-Al
Allan Breed

Jeff L Headley

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Re: Dust Boards
« Reply #21 on: February 16, 2011, 04:54:21 PM »
I have seen many examples of highboys also. Many in Miller's book but no high chests. I have seen one and I can't remember where. Maybe in Williamsburg or MESDA or someone's private collection. I would like to know where if anyone else knows. The chest did have bracket feet. I have not seen this method of extending the side down to the floor used on a high chest before to back up the brackets facade. Certainly seen it on many corner cupboards and other pieces.

jacon4

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Re: Dust Boards
« Reply #22 on: February 16, 2011, 05:12:14 PM »
I would say Jeff's chest is a transitional Queen Anne (1730-1760) tall chest of drawers, transitional because of the W & M secret drawer. Any sign of bat wing brasses?  A few similar form queen anne tall chests that have sold recently

http://www.liveauctioneers.com/item/5241474
http://www.liveauctioneers.com/item/8381236

http://www.liveauctioneers.com/item/8019536
« Last Edit: February 16, 2011, 05:28:59 PM by jacon4 »

Jeff L Headley

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Re: Dust Boards
« Reply #23 on: February 16, 2011, 07:43:22 PM »
My earlier date comes from the rivened oak secondary wood. Just hopeing!

jacon4

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Re: Dust Boards
« Reply #24 on: February 17, 2011, 02:19:06 AM »
Hmmmm, riven oak secondary wood huh, dang, now i am stumped. As Al & you pointed out earlier, that secret drawer is a fairly common feature on W& M highboys but your chest is clearly a tall chest form. The reason i picked Queen Anne is because I am not aware of american tall chest forms in the W&M era, naturally, that doesnt mean there were none. It could be late W & M, say 1720-1730, the feet would help alot, to bad they are missing.
« Last Edit: February 17, 2011, 02:45:51 AM by jacon4 »

jacon4

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Re: Dust Boards
« Reply #25 on: February 17, 2011, 05:15:45 AM »
Meanwhile, back at my chest ranch, my bid of $1630. was beat by a $1730. bid, 4 mins prior to bid dead line, naturally i was on the road at the time and could do nothing about it. Someone got a nice chest in good condition for a very reasonable price.

 
Off thread but there was an important piece of Americana that sold at Christies last month, a John Goddard 1765 chippendale block & shell  bureau table that sold for 5.7 million, a record for this form, the listing
http://www.christies.com/LotFinder/lot_details.aspx?from=salesummary&intObjectID=5401668&sid=d18e3b87-6f8b-40b2-b209-88cd184cdba0
« Last Edit: February 17, 2011, 05:53:23 AM by jacon4 »

jacon4

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Re: Dust Boards
« Reply #26 on: February 18, 2011, 05:13:56 AM »
Hey, I take back what i said about not being aware of american W&M tall chests, here's one with 5 tiers of drawers, not the usual 6 and although it doesnt say if it's american, at least someone in the world was making W&M tall chests in the period. I emailed and asked for details on this chest, the listing.
http://northeastauctions.com/search/detail.php?l=180&a=spring2011

Adam Cherubini

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Re: Dust Boards
« Reply #27 on: February 19, 2011, 05:30:52 AM »
My earlier date comes from the rivened oak secondary wood. Just hopeing!
Philadelphians rived secondary wood at least until the end the of the 18th c.  Most common secondary seems to have been white cedar, though I've seen several mid century pieces with oak as a secondary material.

I'm not good at dating furniture.  I would look at hardware, not species or even methods with a few notable exceptions.

Regardless of the age, it's a pretty piece, Jeff and it looks old to me.

Adam

jacon4

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Re: Dust Boards
« Reply #28 on: February 19, 2011, 06:02:22 AM »
Philadelphians rived secondary wood at least until the end the of the 18th c.

Neat! Agrees with Adam, it's difficult to date pieces unless provenance (chain of custody) can be established which is not common on american furniture. Jeff's tall chest is a fine example of the tall chest form and does it really matter if it was built in 1720 or 1750? Not to me it doesnt.

rac50

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Re: Dust Boards
« Reply #29 on: February 19, 2011, 09:50:58 AM »
This Pennsylvania walnut chest on frame is another possibility for Jeff's chest. It also satisfies Al's comments.
http://www.clprickett.com/CLP4733.htm