Recent Posts

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Finishing / Re: ShellacFinishes.com
« Last post by Hank Beamer on Yesterday at 10:40:16 PM »
Thank you!
Hank
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Finishing / Re: ShellacFinishes.com
« Last post by Antiquity Period Designs, Ltd. on Yesterday at 09:11:29 AM »
The code is:  SAPFM10


Dennis Bork
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Finishing / ShellacFinishes.com
« Last post by Hank Beamer on August 09, 2020, 11:03:25 PM »
Does anyone have the coupon code for ShellacFinishes.com to receive the SAPFM discount?  Vijay gave me the discount a couple of years ago when I purchased some shellac and tried his Royal-Lac finish.  Replying to an email he said that I needed to get the coupon code from a SAPFM officer.  I did not get response to my email to the SAPFM contact us address so I'm posting the question here.
Thank you
Hank Beamer
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Member events / Announcing our Next Virtual Meeting (13 Aug 2020)
« Last post by Mark Maleski on August 02, 2020, 03:48:26 PM »
Hello fellow SAPFM members! We're pleased to invite you to our second virtual Chesapeake chapter meeting which will occur on Thursday, 13 August 2020 @ 8:00 pm (eastern) via Zoom.  All SAPFM members are invited, regardless of where you live.  We have planned the following topics which we will cover over a 1.5 hour meeting duration:
 - George Nissley: Turning a baluster leg for windsor chair
 - Harry Bishop: Details from a reproduction of Thomas Elfe's Chest on Chest
 - Ryan Ketrow: Building Thomas Jefferson's Lap Desk
 - Peter Brown: Sand shading veneer (DEMO)


To sign up, you must send a with a request to [email protected]  Upon receipt, we will add you to the meeting attendee roster, at which point you'll receive an automated invitation from Zoom with the link to join the call and password (please give us at least a day to add you to the Zoom attendee roster).  If you haven't participated in a Zoom call before, you can click the link upon receipt to verify your system is compatible. We can have up to 100 participants on the call, so I don't anticipate turning anyone away.
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Chesapeake Chapter / Announcing our Next Virtual Meeting (13 Aug 2020)
« Last post by Mark Maleski on August 02, 2020, 03:47:35 PM »
Hello fellow SAPFM members! We're pleased to invite you to our next virtual Chesapeake chapter meeting which will occur on Thursday, 13 August 2020 @ 8:00 pm (eastern) via Zoom.  All SAPFM members are invited, regardless of where you live.  We have planned the following topics which we will cover over a 1.5 hour meeting duration:
 - George Nissley: Turning a baluster leg for windsor chair
 - Harry Bishop: Details from a reproduction of Thomas Elfe's Chest on Chest
 - Ryan Ketrow: Building Thomas Jefferson's Lap Desk
 - Peter Brown: Sand shading veneer (DEMO)


To sign up, you must send a with a request to [email protected]  Upon receipt, we will add you to the meeting attendee roster, at which point you'll receive an automated invitation from Zoom with the link to join the call and password (please give us at least a day to add you to the Zoom attendee roster).  If you haven't participated in a Zoom call before, you can click the link upon receipt to verify your system is compatible. We can have up to 100 participants on the call, so I don't anticipate turning anyone away.



Mark Maleski
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I am very sorry to hear that. I wish Phil all the best and a speedy recovery. Going to his school was a great experience. Amazing teacher and a very kind person.
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Unfortunately Phil has become ill and is not longer able to run the school. 
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Just got an email from FIM that they are closing and selling all of their tools. Hopefully it is because Phil wanted to and was not forced to. I took several classes there and really enjoyed them and learned a lot. It's a sad day for woodworking. Again, I hope this was Phil's decision to retire and not something else.
Brian
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Seating Furniture & Beds / Ronnie Young Designed Sleigh Bed Drawings
« Last post by Bill Markert on July 26, 2020, 03:27:42 PM »
Ronnie Young graciously let me develop and share a set of drawings for a Sleigh Bed he designed that I wanted to build.  I posted them to the Member-Submitted Furniture Plans section of the website and you can see pictures of the bed in the Gallery.  Ronnie has built several for his family and we both hope you will put the drawings to use if you find the bed suitable for your family as well.


Bill Markert
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Finishing / Re: Worm holes in Butternut
« Last post by Tom M on July 16, 2020, 09:51:40 AM »
Over the last couple months, I have been able to get into my shop here and there to work on the doors.  I held off for a while as I was trying to find a source for the hinges.  I found a couple places online but never got responses from e-mails and phone calls.  I finally found someone who went so far as to make a prototype and give me a quote, but he has not responded to repeated e-mails in over two months.  I found someone else who hopefully will be getting me a quote this week.


I decided to move forward with the doors as over-lap which means the hinge will require a 5/16” offset.


Even though I modeled the mortise and tenon joint in 3D, I still had a hard time figuring out the order of the build.  I had done this joint on my spice box-on-frame, but that was a long time ago.  I decided to grow the joint on my 3D printer, so I had pieces to hold in my hand for reference.  This worked great and allowed me to break the process down.  It is easy to do if you have done all the layout ahead of time with a knife.


Back in late April I had cut out all the rails and stiles and joined a face on each.  They sat for several weeks and were still flat, so I ran them through my planer (alternating sides) and then final sized them.


I had left my mortiser and tenon jig set-up from the face frame, so cutting these went quickly. I had noticed on the face frame some inconsistent results with the mortise, and so this time I brought a 6” quick release clamp to hold the boards to the fence.  Well worth the extra time of clamping and un-clamping for each plunge.  These were all through mortises which had to be cut from both sides.


I knifed and sawed the tenon shoulder, and then cut the cheeks on my table saw.  I used the band saw to cut the width of the tenons and then a handsaw to remove the waste – followed with a chisel to pare to the knife line.  I then used a shoulder plane to take a little off the tenons for a fit I could tap home by hand.


The next step was to form the molding detail on the inside edge of the door.  I could have used my Stanley 78 and a hollow plane to form this feature, but I decided to use my router table.  When I’ve done copied joints in the past, I spent a lot of time fitting the joint.  I believe this was mainly due to the inconsistent molding profiles. In this case four doors mean sixteen pieces need to be molded.  Half of these are only about 10” long. After routing I spent a couple hours paring away wood and coping the rails. This was relaxing work.


Every frame went together with a nice tight fit on the first try!




Next up: Raised Panels
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