Mechanical movement for tall clock

EdGillham

New member
I'm looking for a simple mechanical movement (prefer a complete package with dial, weights, pendulum) for an 18th century slender waist tall clock. Seems like everyone has gone out of business. If you know of a source or have one available for sale, I would appreciate any leads.
 
Sounds like you are looking for an 8 day bell strike movement? If you are building the case it is better to have the movement in hand before making the case so you can ensure everything will fit. Otherwise you may have to cut clearance holes in the slender waist of your clock for the pendulum bob.

There are a few choices.

1. Buy an antique movement. There are many orphan movements with dials for sale on eBay and other auction sites. It takes time and you will have the additional expense of having it overhauled. But when you are done you will have an heirloom clock that will last.

2. Buy a modern reproduction of an antique style movement. This has the advantage of being ready to go out of the box. An example of a good maker would be David Lindow (https://lindowmachineworks.com/movement-gallery/) This will also give you an heirloom clock.

3. Buy a modern made movement. There are many suppliers of such things, the best of these are made in Germany. Ronnell Clocks, Merritts, or Butterworth Clocks would be suppliers. However these movements are good for 15 or 20 years then it is more economical to replace them than repair. This approach may be a little less expensive up front but is not historically correct and is my least favorite option.

4. Buy a quartz movement. Inexpensive and accurate. Easily replaced when broken and you don't have to wind them. Don't laugh! I like this option better then 3. above. No doubt some will disagree.
 

EdGillham

New member
Sounds like you are looking for an 8 day bell strike movement? If you are building the case it is better to have the movement in hand before making the case so you can ensure everything will fit. Otherwise you may have to cut clearance holes in the slender waist of your clock for the pendulum bob.

There are a few choices.

1. Buy an antique movement. There are many orphan movements with dials for sale on eBay and other auction sites. It takes time and you will have the additional expense of having it overhauled. But when you are done you will have an heirloom clock that will last.

2. Buy a modern reproduction of an antique style movement. This has the advantage of being ready to go out of the box. An example of a good maker would be David Lindow (https://lindowmachineworks.com/movement-gallery/) This will also give you an heirloom clock.

3. Buy a modern made movement. There are many suppliers of such things, the best of these are made in Germany. Ronnell Clocks, Merritts, or Butterworth Clocks would be suppliers. However these movements are good for 15 or 20 years then it is more economical to replace them than repair. This approach may be a little less expensive up front but is not historically correct and is my least favorite option.

4. Buy a quartz movement. Inexpensive and accurate. Easily replaced when broken and you don't have to wind them. Don't laugh! I like this option better then 3. above. No doubt some will disagree.
Thank you for the reply. I had already contacted David Lindow and he is no longer selling movements. Any other sources for a modern reproduction of an 8 day bell strike movement?
 
Ed,
Sorry, I didn't realize that he had stopped, for quality manufactured reproduction movements David was the best and sadly only choice. There are skilled folks making high grade one off clock movements but I'm not sure any of them are still around or would be interested. I will do some investigating. At this point I suspect option 1. may be your best bet. I know it is tempting to just buy a Hermle and be done with it but these really are temporary at best.
 

EdGillham

New member
Ed,
Sorry, I didn't realize that he had stopped, for quality manufactured reproduction movements David was the best and sadly only choice. There are skilled folks making high grade one off clock movements but I'm not sure any of them are still around or would be interested. I will do some investigating. At this point I suspect option 1. may be your best bet. I know it is tempting to just buy a Hermle and be done with it but these really are temporary at best.
Thanks again! I agree. If you come across someone who still makes them, please let me know.
 
Ed,
Sorry no luck. Is getting to the point where most of the folks I used to recommend have all retired or worse.
My best recommendation at this point is to buy an orphan movement and dial and have it overhauled. I am happy to help if you want to discuss specifics offline.
I urge anyone considering the use of antique clock components in their work to be careful about where they buy their components. There are a number of folks who are breaking apart perfectly good clocks (some quite rare) and selling the components on ebay. A particular clock monger in the Chicago area is a prime offender. It may be tempting but please don't buy anything from these folks as the sooner we can make such activities unprofitable the better.
 

Joe J.

New member
Ed,
Sorry no luck. Is getting to the point where most of the folks I used to recommend have all retired or worse.
My best recommendation at this point is to buy an orphan movement and dial and have it overhauled. I am happy to help if you want to discuss specifics offline.
I urge anyone considering the use of antique clock components in their work to be careful about where they buy their components. There are a number of folks who are breaking apart perfectly good clocks (some quite rare) and selling the components on ebay. A particular clock monger in the Chicago area is a prime offender. It may be tempting but please don't buy anything from these folks as the sooner we can make such activities unprofitable the better.
I know who you mean; I've seen his site. Despicable and unscrupulous practice.
 

Joe J.

New member
I'm looking for a simple mechanical movement (prefer a complete package with dial, weights, pendulum) for an 18th century slender waist tall clock. Seems like everyone has gone out of business. If you know of a source or have one available for sale, I would appreciate any leads.
Here is a link to a dial maker/painter. I saw her work at a NAWCC chapter meeting several years ago, but I've never used her services.
 
Top